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Resolution Copper

Three technical problems complicated development of the mine: depth, rock stress, and heat of up to 170 degrees F. The mine will use a process known as block caving in which rock, broken by gravity, is gathered from underneath through shafts and tunnels.

Three technical problems complicated development of the mine: depth, rock stress, and heat of up to 170 degrees F.

Three technical problems complicated development of the mine: depth, rock stress, and heat of up to 170 degrees F. The mine will use a process known as block caving in which rock, broken by gravity, is gathered from underneath through shafts and tunnels.

Three technical problems complicated development of the mine: depth, rock stress, and heat of up to 170 degrees F.

In 1995 a high-grade copper deposit was intersected by drill holes from the underground workings of the old Magma mine three miles east of Superior, Arizona. The deposit, possibly the largest copper deposit in North America, lies deeply buried a mile below the surface under post-mineral rocks. The photo shows the historic Number 9 headframe to the left of the modern Number 10 used to drill the Resolution deposit.

In 1995 a high-grade copper deposit was intersected by drill holes from the underground workings of the old Magma mine three miles east of Superior, Arizona.

The deposit is known only from extensive core drilling (sample shown in photo). The ore is 1.5 percent copper, two to three times the grade generally mined in Arizona. Resolution Copper Mining is in the process of sinking a 7,000 foot shaft with production forecast to begin by 2021.

The deposit is known only from extensive core drilling (sample shown in photo). The ore is 1.5 percent copper, two to three times the grade generally mined in Arizona.